BRAIN DRAIN – Reviews

CF540 - COVER

December 10th, 2019 – The Stash Dauber
(by) – full review: stashdauber.blogspot.com

Things we like: Vomit Fist, Gorilla Mask

“… Whether they’re essaying a heavy groove tune like opener “Rampage,” the wildest freeblow (see “Avalanche!!!”), or a balls-out rocker like the closing “Hoser” (perhaps a nod to Van Huffel’s Canadian roots?), the trio’s music packs a visceral punch worthy of Naked City, Last Exit, or ’73-’74 King Crimson, made even more impactful by the finesse and intention with which they wield it. To these feedback-scorched ears, their most memorable outing yet.”


December 9th, 2019 – Jazz Press PL
(by Rafał Garszczyński) – full review: jazzpress.pl

Alternate Link: http://subiektywnydziennikmuzyczny.blogspot.com/

Gorilla Mask – Brain Drain

“… “Brain Drain” is an example of how to create a hit album without catchy melodies and virtuoso performances. Twisted, though not recombined rhythms are the basis of Gorilla Mask’s music. Against the background, Peter Van Huffel can freely improvise on his saxophones, sometimes in a more free-jazz atmosphere like in “Avalanche !!!”, in a moment more rock – like in “Barracuda”. The improvising saxophone against the backdrop of dynamic bass and percussion is fortunately not the only musical scheme that the band’s musicians have to offer. Hidden at the end of the album “Hoser” is a collective improvisation, a break with the saxophone formula plus a section...”

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November 27th, 2019 – Music and More
(by) – full review: jazzandblues.blogspot.com/

Gorilla Mask – Brain Drain (Clean Feed, 2019)

“… a seriously talented modern jazz band who still remembers how to have fun and make enjoyable and provocative music, unafraid to meld their jazz with a generous helping of punk and metal. “Rampage” opens the album, with some predatory bass and drum action, leading to clusters of ripe saxophone notes, with the group developing a tight groove. The bass takes on different textures and colors with distortion interacting with splashy cymbals and raw horn, as they dig deep and push hard in a riveting fashion…”